Ward 9 Great Neighbourhoods Calgary – Gian-Carlo Carra

This is the official website for Gian-Carlo Carra, City Councillor for Ward 9 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

I Can’t Believe This Garbage at the City

(1 minute read)

I’m happy to announce that the hours at the East Calgary Waste Facility will have new hours of operation!

Starting February 6, 2018, the East Calgary facility will switch to a 6-day-per-week (Monday to Saturday) operation, with seven-day operation taking place from April to October.

In late 2016 Waste & Recycling Services had a significant revenue shortfall due to a decline in waste being sent to their facilities. Facing this difficult situation, they made the decision to lay off landfill workers and reduce their hours of operation and switched to a staggered schedule where each of their sites would be open four days a week.

These changes helped reduce operating costs. However, through conversations with many customers, constituents and by observing what is working and what isn’t, it became clear that they needed to offer more predictable service to residents and convenience to the commercial customers who are responsible for most of their revenue.

With this change, they have increased the total number of weekdays they are open and increased the number of operating days to 13 per week in the summer instead of the current 12. This has all been accomplished without increasing our operating budget.

If you would like more information, please feel free to follow me on Twitter at www.twitter.com/gccarra, Facebook at www.facebook.com/gccarra, or contact me at 403-268-5330.

Thanks!

Zoo Road and 12 Street S.E. Bridge Opening

It is with genuine excitement and enthusiasm that I send out this invitation on behalf of the 12 Street S.E. Bridge Replacement and the Zoo Flood Mitigation project teams, as well as your Team Ward 9, to join us for the official opening of Zoo Road and the 12 Street S.E. (Zoo) Bridge. 

Please Join Us!

When: Saturday December 9, 2017

Time: 1pm to 3pm 

Where: 12th Street Bridge S.E. (south side)

There will be food and warm drinks along with games, caroling, horse and wagon rides and a visit from Santa. Don't miss out on this family-friendly celebration to thank our Ward 9 neighbours for their patience and understanding.

On that note, I would like to personally thank all of you who endured the many months of construction (and earsplitting noise from the pile driving!).  I know this was not always easy, and there were a lot of lessons-learned as we worked to coordinate the different projects happening throughout Inglewood and Ramsay.  

The 12 Street S.E. Bridge is just the beginning. Through the Main Streets program we will also address the entire length of 12 Street S.E. from the bridge deck to the Green Line LRT Station, four blocks south. With more major infrastructure work to come, I am confident that we will be able to mitigate the impacts on our communities while meeting the project timelines. And you can be sure that I will be fighting tooth-and-nail to ensure the needs and wants of our neighbours are heard by City Administration. 

This historic re-investment into the original neighbourhoods of Calgary is an incredible first step in building a better city for us all. I am proud to say that we are working towards a city that focuses on putting tax-dollars back into the inner-city rather than subsidizing unsustainable growth out on the edges. Over this term you can be sure that I will be holding the City's feet to the fire to make sure that we extend this re-investment to all our great neighbourhoods in Ward 9 (I'm looking at you, East Calgary). 


Want to know more? 

Have a look at all the Inglewood and Ramsay area projects.

inglewood-ramsay-projects-map-mar-2017.jpg

Building Local Communities - A National Housing Strategy That Lasts?

(1 minute read)

Providing affordable housing to Calgarians is a major point of my Great Neighbourhoods platform. I know a lot of you are interested in seeing this land well and have the best return on investment possible - financially, socially and environmentally - for our city and citizens.

On Wednesday, November 22, 2017, the federal government released a $40-billion national housing program. I welcome the federal government’s increased direct involvement in the delivery of affordable housing.

On my initial reading, it seems that the strategy does reflect a resident-centric approach. My desire is that a large part of this strategy has meaningful consultation with Calgarians and complements the work that The City of Calgary has been doing.

I’m optimistic that the federal government’s commitment on capital funding to deliver new affordable housing will positively impact thousands of families in Calgary, in general, and East Calgary, specifically.

While my colleagues on City Council and I look forward to working with all orders of government to ensure the most efficient and impactful use of these funds, I will remain laser-focused on ensuring the details on how this funding will flow to Calgary, what projects City Council sees as priorities, and how this funding can positively uplift and impact our friends and neighbours in our neighbourhoods.

I was also encouraged to read that the federal government will be creating a $2,500 per year housing benefit to support both tenants and non-profit housing providers alike, making many more units affordable.

As with all policies and programs that affect Calgarians, I support the direction or prioritizing research and evidence-based approaches to make sure we have the best possible policies for those who need them the most.

I will continue to keep focused on delivering the best outcomes for our citizens building Great Neighbourhoods.

To Bid or Not To Bid? Update on the 2026 Winter OIympics

Many of our Ward 9 neighbours have been asking our office about Calgary's potential bid for the 2026 Winter Olympics, particularity with Council's decision on Monday, November 20th to increase the bid exploration budget by $1 million. 

As it stands, I am undecided on where I land with the 2026 Olympic Bid for Calgary. Ultimately, I believe that the Olympics need Calgary more than Calgary needs the Olympics.

Calgarians have been divided around the idea of hosting another Olympic Games. On the one hand, those who oppose Calgary putting forward a bid for 2026 believe that the Olympics have become a deeply corrupt organization that costs a tremendous amount of money with little return for the host city. On the other hand, many reflect on the success of the 1988 Winter Games and the spirit of volunteerism and pride that showcased our incredible city in this stunning part of the world. 

The fate of the Olympics as an organization is unknown. If it continues on its current path it may cease to exist entirely. However, if the IOC goes down a path of reform, Calgary may have a real opportunity to show the world (once again) our amazing city, which is built on the principles of good governance, and the incredible people that live here all while renewing our Olympic legacy. It may also bring significant economic development and infrastructure opportunities to this entire region and continue to develop Calgary as a centre of sports excellence.

Can we get there?

That is what City Council and the Olympic Bid Committee are working to figure out right now.

The original budget for the Olympic Bid Committee was $5 million. After the report was complete there was $1.5 million left over. Council agreed on Monday, November 20th to allow for another $2 million for further research into a potential bid for 2026. Only $1 million will be given at this time.


Want to know more?

Watch Gian-Carlo's video -  posted January 2017 - when Council first received an update from Administration on this issue. 

Check out the City of Calgary's Olympic Bid page and the Calgary Bid Exploration committee's work. 

3 Things We Can Do To Make Our Neighbourhoods Even Better

(2 minute read)

Building communities can seem like it’s a big job for one person. When I speak with residents they ask me how they can make a difference in their neighbourhood. After thinking about it, here are three things that aren’t hard, expensive, or time-consuming to do.

1.       If you see something, say something

The squeaky wheel always gets the grease.

Apathy kills neighbourhood pride. Too often, we let things slide and get out of hand. The best way to make sure your neighbourhood thrives is to use the resources that The City of Calgary has. For example, if you see a pothole, a neighbours yard or park space that isn’t kept up you can call Calgary 311 or use their website or mobile app and report it. If there’s been a crime, call the Calgary Police Services non-emergency line at 403-266-1234. If you see a crime in progress, call 911. Also, don’t forget to call me, your City Councillor, to talk about what we can do together to make things even better in your neighbourhood.  Remember, these services and people are here to help. You’re NEVER bothering us.

 

2.       Join your community association

Your time volunteering for your community association can be as much or as little as you can afford to give. The most important thing is getting involved!

Joining is the next best thing you can do to make a neighbourhood better. There is a link between activity in the community association and the level of service that those communities get from The City of Calgary. Community associations in Calgary have a lot of influence with the City of Calgary and with the City Councillor. You may know community associations put on events, rent hall space, and provide space for sports activities. What you may not know is that community associations have the support of a dedicated City of Calgary Neighbourhood Partnership Coordinator, has a Community Resource Officer from the Calgary Police Service who attends meetings, along with your City Councillor, and makes comments on land use, traffic, and parking changes.

Unsightly yards and park space? A Beautification Committee can be started to address them.

Traffic problems? A Traffic & Parking committee can look into how to fix those problems.

No community garden? A Community Garden committee can work towards starting one.

The strength of community associations and their activity in a neighbourhood depends on the ideas that residents have.

 

3.       Get to know your neighbours

The easiest thing that you can do to make your communities more vibrant, safer, and full of community pride is getting to know your neighbours.

It’s a simple thing, but something that has gotten lost in the hustle and bustle of our daily lives. Knowing your neighbours goes a long way in making sure that your community is safe. Being able to know when something or somebody is suspicious in your neighbourhood is directly linked to whether or not you know your neighbours and their friends.

By saying hello, going to community, Stampede and Neighbour Day events goes a long way in fostering that small-town and village feel that we love in our communities.

These are a few of my thoughts. If you have other ideas on how we can make neighbourhoods better, I encourage you to send me an email to ward09@calgary.ca or follow me on Twitter or Facebook (www.twitter.com/gccarra and www.facebook.com/gccarra) or call my office at 403-268-5330.

Let’s continue the tradition of making sure that the best neighbourhoods in Calgary are found in East Calgary.

Gian-Carlo Carra

Welcome to the New Ward 9

Dear Ward 9 Neighbours, 

This is the first opportunity I’ve had to write to you since Calgary’s municipal election on October 16th. Firstly, I am deeply honoured to be representing the amazing neighbourhoods of Ward 9 for a third term and am so grateful for the support and encouragement I received to continue our mission of building Great Neighbourhoods.

Though this election was, at times, divisive and discouraging, it is my belief that our Ward 9 neighbours were clear in their commitment to building a city that is affordable, vibrant, inclusive, economically diverse and pays for itself in the long-term.

Over the last few weeks, your Team Ward 9 has been busy getting the office ready for this exciting third term and (re)connecting with many of our neighbours. Together, there is a lot we want to accomplish over the next four years in our new Ward 9.

As many of you are aware, city-wide changes to each ward came into effect immediately after the election.  Ward 9 maintained 8 of our original communities and gained 8 new ones.

Together, we represent a strong, unified East Calgary. 

Your Ward 9 is made up of the following communities: 

  • Renfrew
  • Bridgeland-Riverside
  • Inglewood
  • Ramsay
  • Manchester
  • Millican-Ogden-Lynwood
  • Fairview 
  • Dover
  • Southview
  • Albert Park-Radisson Heights
  • Erin Woods
  • Forest Lawn
  • Forest Heights
  • Penbrooke Meadows
  • Applewood Park
  • Red Carpet 
Each icon represents all the unique neighbourhoods that make up Ward 9!

Each icon represents all the unique neighbourhoods that make up Ward 9!

Find more information about our Ward 9 neighbourhoods and some of the work I have done over the last seven years through our Community Objectives Workshops.  You can also check out the latest episode of Ward 9 TV Lite, my video-blog to stay up-to-date and informed about what is happening at City Hall and in our communities. 

Please know that I am here to serve you as your City Councillor. Do not hesitate to reach out to your Team Ward 9 if you have any neighbourhood issues, concerns, ideas or insights. 

Looking forward to working with all the Ward 9 great neighbourhoods this term!

Yours truly,

Gian-Carlo

Gian-Carlo